5 Useful Discipline Techniques


5 Useful Discipline Techniques



 1. Reward good behaviour 

Acknowledging good behaviour is the best way to encourage your child to continue it. In other words, "Catch him being good." Compliment your child when he or she shows the behaviour you've been seeking.
 
2. Natural consequences 
Your child does something wrong, and you let the child experience the result of that behaviour. There's no need for you to "lecture." The child can't blame you for what happened. For example, if a child deliberately breaks a toy, he or she no longer has that toy to play with. Natural consequences can work well when children don't seem to "hear" your warnings about the potential outcome of their behaviour. Be sure, however, that any consequence they might experience isn't dangerous.
 
3. Logical consequences 
This technique is similar to natural consequences but involves describing to your child what the consequences will be for unacceptable behaviour. The consequence is directly linked to the behaviour. For example, you tell your child that if he doesn't pick up his toys, then those toys will be removed for a week.
 
4. Taking away privileges 
Sometimes there isn't a logical or natural consequence for a bad behaviour -- or you don't have time to think it through. In this case, the consequence for unacceptable behaviour may be taking away a privilege. For example, if a middle schooler doesn't complete her homework on time, you may choose to take away television privileges for the evening. This discipline technique works best if the privilege is:
 
Related in some way to the behaviour
Something the child values
Taken away as soon as possible after the inappropriate behaviour (especially for young children)
 
5. Time outs 
Time outs work if you know exactly what the child did wrong or if you need a break from the child's behaviour. Be sure you have a time-out location established ahead of time. It should be a quiet, boring place -- probably not the bedroom (where the child can play) or a dangerous place like a bathroom. This discipline technique can work with children when the child is old enough to understand the purpose of a time out -- usually around age 2 and older, with about a minute of time out for each year of age. Time outs often work best with younger kids for whom the separation from the parent is truly seen as a deprivation.
 
This article is an excerpt from www.webmd.com/parenting/guide/discipline-tactics
 

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